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2009.12.21

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Adam H.

I see the potential of tweets as a business owner and as a person with an enormous number of friends all over the globe. It allows me to share the (sometimes boring / sometimes fascinating) inner workings of my biz with friends, family, and potentially new friends. It starts the conversation rather than finishing it. The fundamental human need you speak of is sharing oneself with others.

The problem only arises when we lose those richer human experiences by constantly being on our own little tweet island. I tweet, you reply. Now: we should have a phone call or longer email or date or hang out sesh. We've lost our way a bit, and that's only natural.

Facebook on the other hand is gross. The article is dead on about the lack of depth. It causing someone to be confused about who they are is just the tip of the iceberg. People's online personas are dishonest, fantasy crap stores.

Until I can "Dislike" someone's status, link, post, etc. we've taken a giant step backwards in online interaction. [Just the fact that Tumblr and Facebook have reduced feedback from varying length comments that require full blown human thought into single buttons which represent Love/Like bothers the hell out of me.] Facebook's theory that no one should ever get their feelings hurt (being notified you were unfriended also falls into this category) is the same type of nonsense that over-coddling parents are ruining their children with.

No, this isn't an argument for long-winded comment sections and flame-wars. It's a request that people learn to type as well as they can speak. This would also involve people learning to speak and have proper human interactions again.

Oof...I'm starting one hell of a wishlist for humans and the internets, huh?

sam

"This stuff would not survive, we would not be obsessed by it, if it did not meet a fundamental human need."

Said the Junkie to the Needle.

Does fulfillment of "fundamental human needs" always lead to destruction concurrent with beauty (religion, drugs, social media...)?

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